THE adjacent possible Workshop

"In times of change, learners inherit the earth while the 'experts'

find themselves beautifully equipped for a world that no longer exists." 

- Eric Hoffer

 

From November 9th to the 12th, 2021, The Center for Emergent Diplomacy is offering a virtual workshop emerging from collaboration with the Integrative Peacebuilding Network in Ottawa, Canada. The workshop consists of 4 1/2 days of mini-lectures and participatory exercises, where participants learn to lead conversations that result in emergent systemic strategies for dealing with climate change. Founder and Executive Director Dr. Merle Lefkoff will be the lead facilitator.  

Register here!

Climate change is an existential threat to human civilization as global warming and species
extinction continue to accelerate, rapidly out-pacing present global security and the climate
models calculating the risks to our living systems. “Integrative Peacebuilding” themes address
the need to minimize human suffering in conflict zones, now increasingly facing the “multiplier”
effects of extreme weather on food and health insecurity. Applying the “Comprehensive
Approach” to these unprecedented problems challenges all levels of government, from
Aboriginal Affairs to Agriculture, from Human Rights to Immigration, from Global Affairs to the
Canadian Forces-- to transform from siloed policymaking to cooperative problem-solving. This
course is designed to train leaders to facilitate inclusive meetings (including civil society
institutions and leaders) that navigate potential policy solutions addressing the future of
international diplomacy and foreign policy in a present and future environment more uncertain
than ever.


Dr. Merle Lefkoff, with decades of experience as an international mediator and facilitator
introduces a new method for collective problem-solving called “the Adjacent Possible” or
“TAP”. Drawn from Complexity science, the name is in reference to breakthrough ideas waiting
in the wings to be uncovered in order to provide unprecedented and scalable ideas for how to
anticipate and prepare for the unknown future. We learn how to turn the best new ideas into
actionable policy initiatives to insure a peaceful adaptation to living with nature on an altered
planet. Combining mini-lectures, suggested readings, participatory exercises, and opportunities
for practicing together on Zoom, we will dialogue deeply about the consequences for
international stability from new trade wars, resource wars, mass migration, and if there is
interest the heightened possibility of nuclear war resulting from the new arms race tied to
climate-related events.


*Understand the core principles of Complexity science and Integrative Peacebuilding.
*Expand knowledge of the major risks to peace and national security from global warming.
*Learn how to facilitate a “TAP” problem-solving meeting.
*Discuss and practice the skills necessary to facilitate a comprehensive and systemic approach
to the policies needed to secure a peaceful transition to living on future Earth.

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Facilitating Breakthrough Strategies to Address the Global Climate Crisis 

Climate change is a near-to-midterm existential threat to human civilizations if global warming and species extinction continue to accelerate.  We are stuck in old conversations and problem-solving processes that no longer work for the present unprecedented challenges of how we shall live peacefully and sustainability on the altered planet of the present and unknown future. This course invites heads of civil society organizations, policy-makers, national security experts, and emerging community leaders, to learn how to facilitate a breakthrough group process for resilience and adaptation, based on the principles of Complex Adaptive Systems theory and practice.

The  concept of “the adjacent possible” (TAP), waiting in the shadows to be discovered, opens the door to a problem-solving methodology for addressing issues such as the fight for control of shipping lanes in the melting Arctic, and the consequences for international stability from mass migration due to drought, fire and flooding.  We also look at the climate crisis as a “threat multiplier”, driving up the possibility of nuclear war resulting from a new global arms race tied to climatic events.

After this workshop, participants will:

Understand basic principles underlying Complex Adaptive Systems theory and practice

 

Learn how to facilitate the TAP group process

 

Expand their knowledge of the major risks of climate catastrophe

Recognize the difference between systemic interventions and band-aid solutions

Internalize hope for the possibility of a flourishing future for all species living on Earth

This workshop is hosted by the University of Ottawa, Canada. For registration details and pricing, please follow this link. Please note that the cost is listed in Canadian dollars. 

© 2017

Center for Emergent Diplomacy
​1000 Cordova Place #401 
Santa Fe, NM 87505, USA 

+1 303 859 5609

info@emergentdiplomacy.org